Tag Archive: education



As covered by our previous postings of the Hole in Wall project which started of as a curious experiment and continued as a chain of experiments across rural india has finally crossed its boundaries and reached schools in UK and italy and is all poised to challenge all kinds of barriers like language, culture, age to education. Dr. Sugata Mitra Speaks at TED.

Pakistan’s Education Emergency


The sad state of primary education in Pakistan has already been covered on our blog previously here while discussing the importance of teach for Pakistan initiative. Recently Pakistan Education Task Force released some mindblowing statistics about primary education and Pakistan’s role in UN’s MDG of education for all. The post on Pakistaniat.com has comprehensively covered this issue. Let’s join hands to act and lets start by signing the petition here. The education taskforce has called for “March for Education”: All Pakistan should talk bout during march is education (and cricket).

 

Pakistan’s flood of 2010 was the largest in the country’s history. We still haven’t  recovered from the incredible destruction of life, property and infrastructure that it left in its wake. No one can argue that if such a calamity were to occur year after year, the existence of the country would be in jeopardy. The economic impact of a 2010 like flood year after year is no different than the long-term consequence of illiteracy in Pakistan!

Continue Reading at ATP’s post.

Macedonia’s Primary Education Project (PEP)


The Primary Education Project (PEP) is a five-year initiative targeting all public primary schools in Macedonia. PEP seeks to improve the quality of instruction and increase employment skills in youth.

PEP’s ICT in Education Component is supporting the computerization of Macedonia’s primary schools by training teachers, developing maintenance solutions, providing digital content, and introducing innovative uses of ICT such as computer control, robotics, electronic music, video & audio recording.

The highlights of ICT component are that it supports the development of digital content for Macedonia’s schools and helps to adapt and localize existing applications in Macedonian and Albanian. The focus is on Math and Science, but content is created across the curriculum. This will enable students to benefit from modern technology in all subjects. PEP has also introduced innovative hardware and software solutions in selected primary schools in Macedonia. The range of hardware varies from low-cost lap-tops to electronic microscopes, music recording equipment, robots and control technology kits.

Macedonia, once the least developed of the Yugoslav republics,has been transformed into the world’s first “wireless country” of its size or larger. Through a grant from USAID, and support from Microsoft, Motorola and several other partners, AED project Macedonia Connects worked with a local internet service provider to connect every one of the country’s 430 primary and secondary schools to a wireless network. Now a vast majority—95%—of the country’s population has access to wireless, broadband internet service.

(Sources: PEP, USAID)
Further Details


The JEI is one of Her Majesty’s Queen Rania Al Abdullah’s nonprofit organizations. The JEI works hand in hand with the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Information Communication Technology (MoICT) to support Jordan’s efforts to improve the education system and its use of ICT to transform the learning environment in Jordanian schools and advance learning for all students.

Since its launch in 2003 by the World Economic Forum partners, the JEI has been involved in multimillion dollar initiatives that have had a strong impact on the modernization of education in Jordan. The JEI relies highly on partnerships and collaborations with local and global entities. The global partners include WEF, USAID, UNESCO, CISCO, Intel, Microsoft, Oracle, HP, IBM, SMART etc. Direct contributions to the Initiative from global and local partners have reached over US$ 25 million.

The initiative has so far reached more than 80,000 students, up-skilled more than 3,000 teachers across 102 Jordanian Public Schools. Thousands of electronic lessons have been developed and many electronic teaching tools and equipments have been deployed in schools. The JEI has also employed SMART interactive whiteboards in its discovery schools. The JEI has also piloted installing 100 Intel Classmate PCs in discovery schools.

The JEI has not only received an award from Ministry of Education but has also received 2009 UNESCO award for use of ICT in education.

(Sources: JEI, WEF )

Further Details

INTEL ICT Programs in Pakistan


The Intel® Teach Program launched in Pakistan in March 2002, which focuses on giving ‘extensive training and resources’ to promote ‘effective technology use in the classroom’. The program offers several courses to train the teachers, though all focus on incorporating technology into teaching, yet the course titled “skills for success course” is particularly designed for the ICT teachers. According to Intel’s official stats they have successfully trained more than 220,000 teachers reaching out to over 70 districts and cities so far … targeting remote schools like ‘Dewan Farooq Memorial School’ (Badin, Sindh) as well as developed school systems like PAF or Fazaia School System (having 25 schools nationwide). Recently Intel, Pre-STEP & USAID have made an agreement for strengthening teacher training institutes.

The ICT integration into the curricula has not only paid off in terms of improving the education standards but also has led to several community based initiatives, cleanliness drives and awareness campaigns!

The National Science Olympiad affiliated with Intel® is held in collaboration with ministry of education as well as science and technology, for students from grade 9 – 12 aimed at promoting research based learning among students, particularly in Science and Mathematics. The winners of the Olympiad are then selected for the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair which “is the world’s largest pre-college science fair competition, where students have a chance to explore, discover, and innovate.”

Is Pakistan Really “Participating” in One Laptop Per Child?


How many countries are really participating in One Laptop Per Child? Do you know? Does Nicholas Negroponte know? I only know that the definition of “participation” is rather loose right about now.

On one end of the spectrum, we have Australia, where two laptops somehow mean a pilot. On another end we have Pakistan, a country that really has need as Farrukh Ansari says in an OLPC News comment:

Could anyone tell me that how i can get this laptop for my kids, they are keen to use it, but as i live in Karachi, Pakistan, how i can get it. Please, someone help me to find the way to get it.

 

Well Nicholas Negroponte says Farrukh will soon be in luck:

We are talking to the Philippines and Pakistan – I’m convinced that’s going to happen.

Dr. Negroponte has reason for optimism. He has the commitment of the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Shaukat Aziz. According to an APP news article from November 29, 2006:

Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz said Wednesday the government will consider the feasibility for making low-cost laptop computers available to school going children in Pakistan. 

He was talking to Nicholas Negroponte, who is the head of the MIT Media Laboratory and Chairman of a non-profit organization called One-Laptop-Per-Child (OLPC), which promotes the production of laptops for children at low rates.

The Prime Minister asked the Ministry of IT and Telecom to form a committee to look into the feasibility of such an initiative.

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